up

Corticosteroid Classes

Synonyms and Other Names


Class A: Hydrocortisone and tixocortol type
Cortisone
Cortisone acetate
Hydrocortisone
Hydrocortisone acetate
Methylprednisolone
Methylprednisolone acetate
Prednisolone
Prednisolone acetate
Tixocortol pivalate

Class B: Triamcinolone acetonide type
Triamcinolone acetonide
Triamcinolone alcohol
Halcinonide
Flucinonide
Flucinonide acetonide
Desonide
Budesonide
Amcinonide

Class C: Betamethasone type
Betamethasone
Betamethasone - disodium phosphate
Dexamethasone
Dexamethasone - disodium phosphate
Fluocortolone

Class D: Hydrocortisone - 17-butyrate and clobetasone-17-butyrate type
Hydrocortisone butyrate
Hydrocortisone valerate
Clobetasone butyrate
Clobetasol propionate
Betamethasone valerate
Betamethasone dipropionate
Fluocortolone hexanoate
Fluocortolone pivalate
Prednicarbate
Alclometasone dipropionate

Uses

Corticosteroid agents are used extensively in medicine and dentistry. They can be administered by infusion and injection, by mouth, by respiratory and nasal inhaler, by enema, in eye and ear drops and ointments, and in creams, lotions, ointments, and tapes for skin application. Most of these are prescription products in the United States (except class A).

Prevention

Patients allergic to some corticosteroids should be told which of these four previously described classes of agents they should avoid. Because almost all of these are available only by prescription, allergic and give them a copy of this sheet for the medical records.

Because two products in class A are available without a prescription - hydrocortisone and hydrocortisone acetate - the ingredient list of any medicated cream, lotion, or the like should be examined before purchasing, to be certain that it does not contain either agent.

Individuals who are allergic to agents in class B may also react to agents in class D.


May be duplicated for use in clinical practice. From Marks JG Jr, Elsner P, DeLeo VA: Contact and occupational dermatology, ed 3, St Louis, 2002, Mosby.